Bridging the gab between Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8

I hope that Microsoft is working hard on bridging the obvious gab between Windows 8’s modern UI and Windows Phone, especially with the built-in apps. If Microsoft is really after a single consistent experience, when it comes to the user interface, on all their platforms then they still have a lot to work on at least when trying to bridge the gaps.

Here are a few things I’d like to see Microsoft’s Windows and Windows Phone teams working on:

Like Windows 8, Windows Phone also needs a screen rotation lock option.

The same experience we get with Xbox Music & Videos apps on Windows 8 must be consistent on Windows Phone 8. “Music + Videos” app must go.

Windows Phone and Windows 8 are mobile products at heart, which means that IE10 on both of them deserve a reading mode.

Windows Phone’s built-in apps should be updatable from the Windows Phone Store like on Windows 8, including Internet Explorer.

Apps on Windows Phone 8 should install the same way as on Windows 8, they should immediately be pinned to the Start screen.

The super easy way of changing tile sizes on Windows Phone 8 also needs to be implemented in Windows 8. Not sure why this isn’t the case.

Windows Phone’s “Me” tile needs to be added to Windows 8. Having it hidden in the “People” hub doesn’t make sense.

Windows Phone Feature Suggestion

It’s great that Microsoft gave their customers the ability to share their ideas through UserVoice to help improve Windows Phone. But is that enough? Absolutely not.

Microsoft allowed Windows Phone owners to add feature suggestions on the website since the product launched (or maybe a few weeks after) but never really showed us how those features are ever taken into consideration or even being talked about among the Windows Phone development team.

There are feature suggestions on the website that have been at the top of the list for over a year without any indication that they will be added in a future release or that they’re being discussed yet Windows Phone received several updates since it launched without including those items. There is a clear missing link between those feature suggestions and the development team.

Just like Windows 8, the team shows the world how they’re taking customer feedback into their next major release through Twitter, YouTube and even adding many detailed blog posts. Why isn’t Windows Phone following the same approach? In the end, Windows Phone is an operating system that is currently powering more than a million of smartphones today.

All I am saying is that Microsoft can’t just tell people to go and add their ideas on another website and then be completely silent about it. They need to engage and converse closely with their Windows Phone customers just like the Windows team are doing with Windows 8.

Windows 8 on ARM

The thought of Windows on ARM based devices is great and opens up a lot of new areas for Windows to live on. But will it be a real competitor to other popular tabular based computing devices (shall I say iPad, Android tablets)?

The new Windows on ARM may definitely prove worthy but it could be for a niche market (initially), but then again we did say the same when Android started to show up on tablets.

I must say I always wanted to use Windows through a touch experience but it never did work out the way it meant to be through all the iterations of Windows and including Windows 7. Now that Windows 8 is ‘reimagined’ for an elegant metro style touch experience, I couldn’t be more excited to get some serious hands-on experience.

Having said all that, maybe Windows is finally at a stage where people need it on ARM hardware. Something super light, highly portable, consumer based and (most importantly) FUN to use for all ages. I mean when you think about, it’s all about the experience in the end.

Just Installed Windows XP Service Pack 3

Win SP3 So I installed SP3 on two different machines and so far so good. Although I did notice one tiny problem after installation. Windows Live Messenger seemed to give me an error when it first launches. It says something about a problem with the Windows Live Messenger package. But of course a simple uninstall and reinstall of Windows Live Messenger did solve this issue. 

Other than that, everything seems to run smoothly. Of course SP3 didn’t add any new functionality or features. It’s simply a package containing all updates released after SP2.

Anyway, the only change you will see is a new service pack number under the System Properties window.